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Think fast, robot

Algorithm that harnesses data from a new sensor could make autonomous robots more nimble. One of the reasons we don’t yet have self-driving cars and mini-helicopters delivering online purchases is that autonomous vehicles tend not to perform well under pressure. A system that can flawlessly parallel park at 5 mph may have trouble avoiding obstacles … Continue reading

Electric school buses that power grid could save school districts millions

Electric school buses that feed the power grid could save school districts millions of dollars — and reduce children’s exposure to diesel fumes — based on recent research by the University of Delaware’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment (CEOE). A new study examines the cost-effectiveness of electric school buses that discharge their batteries into … Continue reading

Can software suffer? The complicated ethics of brain emulation

Scientists may be years away from successfully emulating a human or animal brain for research purposes, but the significant – and perhaps unexpected – ethical challenges such work presents have been outlined in a thought-provoking article in the Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artificial Intelligence. “Whole brain emulation (WBE),” writes Anders Sandberg of Oxford’s Future … Continue reading

Security and Privacy? Now they can go hand in hand

Online identification and authentication keeps transactions secure on the Internet, however this has also implications for your privacy. Disclosing more personal information than needed online when, say, you log in to your bank website may simplify the bank’s security at the cost of your privacy. Now, thanks to research by the EU-funded project Attribute-based Credentials … Continue reading

Experimental Trial Represents Promising Step Toward Universal Antidote for Snakebite

A team of researchers, led by Dr. Matthew Lewin of the California Academy of Sciences and Dr. Stephen P. Samuel of Trinity College Dublin, Ireland has taken another promising step toward developing a universal antidote for snakebite. Last summer, the team tested the effectiveness of a nasally administered antiparalytic drug on mice injected with high … Continue reading

Promising approach to slow brain degeneration in a model of Huntington’s disease uncovered

Mechanism uncovered could also help preserve neuron function in Alzheimer’s disease, traumatic brain injury and other neurodegenerative conditions Research presented by Dr. Lynn Raymond, from the University of British Columbia, shows that blocking a specific class of glutamate receptors, called extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, can improve motor learning and coordination, and prevent cell death in animal … Continue reading

Supersonic spray delivers high-quality graphene layer at low cost

A simple, inexpensive spray method that deposits a graphene film can heal manufacturing defects and produce a high-quality graphene layer on a range of substrates, report researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Korea University. The new method of deposition, which allows graphene to “heal” its defects during application, is simple, inexpensive, and … Continue reading

‘Nanodaisies’ Deliver Drug Cocktail to Cancer Cells

Biomedical engineering researchers have developed daisy-shaped, nanoscale structures that are made predominantly of anti-cancer drugs and are capable of introducing a “cocktail” of multiple drugs into cancer cells. The researchers are all part the joint biomedical engineering program at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “We found that … Continue reading

Scientists from CERN and MIT launch encrypted email service

The privacy of the data that we put online has been a hot topic over the last year. In order to protect against unwanted snooping, a group of scientists has created a new secure email service. ProtonMail provides end-to-end encryption, meaning that even the company itself can’t even see the content of your messages. People … Continue reading

Low Power, Longer Distance, Tiny Package: New Laser Sensing Technology for Self-driving Cars, Smartphones and 3-D Video Games

A new twist on 3-D imaging technology could one day enable your self-driving car to spot a child in the street half a block away, let you answer your Smartphone from across the room with a wave of your hand, or play “virtual tennis” on your driveway. The new system, developed by researchers at the … Continue reading

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